Henry David Thoreau about the Fate of Most People in Modern Society (1854)

“Most men, even in this comparatively free country, through mere ignorance and mistake, are so occupied with the factitious cares and superfluously coarse labors of life that its finer fruits cannot be plucked by them. Their fingers, from excessive toil, are too clumsy and tremble too much for that. Actually, the laboring man has not leisure for a true integrity day by day; he cannot afford to sustain the manliest relations to men; his labor would be depreciated in the market. He has no time to be anything but a machine”.

Henry David Thoreau (1817 – 1862) in the first chapter “Economy” of his book “Walden” (1854) about the fate of most people in modern society.

Wikipedia: Henry David Thoreau

Wikipedia: Walden (1854)

Project Gutenberg: “Walden” and “On the Duty of Civil Disobedience”

See also my article (written in German): “Henry David Thoreaus `Walden´ (1854) und John Stuart Mills `On Liberty (1859)´“.

Creative Commons Lizenzvertrag Henry David Thoreau about the Fate of Most People in Modern Society (1854) steht unter einer Creative Commons Namensnennung-NichtKommerziell-KeineBearbeitung 3.0 Unported Lizenz

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